Tim O’Reilly on digital rights management and e-books

Via Forbes:

People who don’t pay you generally wouldn’t have paid you anyway. We’re delighted when people who can’t afford our books don’t pay us for them, if they go out and do something useful with that information … There’s a bakery in Berkeley that every day dumps a lot of fresh bread into a dumpster behind the store. And there’s a bunch of people who get their bread there. I guarantee you that there are a lot more people who, even if you told them they could, would not do that. A lot of sources of free content are like going rooting through the dumpster.

The Guardian: 10 years of the iPod

Great retrospective piece on the iPod from inception to date. This raises the question of whether the iPod it set to be retired this year:.

Steve Jobs, a Bob Dylan fan who once dated the singer’s ex, Joan Baez, insisted that people wanted to own their music, not rent it. They had collected vinyl, cassettes and CDs in the past and they would collect digital music in the future. One by one, Jobs managed to talk the big five major labels into signing up to his vision. “Jobs’s stock went from $8bn to $80bn,” recalls one music executive. “Ours went in reverse.” Sony, in particular, was hamstrung. On the one hand its hardware division wanted to push a Walkman that would compete with the iPod. On the other, its record label, Sony Music, accounted for the majority of its revenues and was unwilling to push forward with something they thought would be filled with illegally downloaded music. Paralysed, Sony allowed Apple to clean up on both the digital device and the songs to play on it.

Our SXSW 2011 Presentation on Visualizing Government Data is now online [Updated]

Our panel at SXSW 2011 was a great experience, thanks largely to an outpouring of engagement from government professionals and contractors. Our hashtag is still active on Twitter.

As promised, I’ll answer questions as they come in via the hashtag #visualgov. Or, just e-mail me if you’d like to discuss something in private.

Here’s the link to our slides.

Update: Audio of the talk is now available.

[podcast]http://michaelcastellon.net/wp-content/uploads/2011/03/Why-Visualizing-Government-Data-Makes-Taxpayers-Happy.mp3[/podcast]

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My SXSW 2011 Panel: Visualizing Government Data for Public Trust

I’ll be on a panel next Saturday at SXSW 2011 titled Why Visualizing Government Data Makes Taxpayers Happy.

I’m really hoping to see a lot of people from local, state and federal government at SXSW this year. This is a great year for public sector employees attending the conference.

Here are a few of the things I’m going to discuss with my co-panelist and friend @jeremiahakin:

  • Why open data is important to government transparency and earning the public’s trust
  • How the federal government has served as a model
  • How agencies can distribute data visualization across teams, often to non-technical workers.
  • What tools agencies and other organizations can use to adopt similar strategies
  • The value and risks associated with various file formats, including Fusion Table and Google Earth.
  • Upcoming data visualization trends

My Schedule is a work in progress. Talk to me on Twitter if you’re attending SXSW 2011.